37 C
Lahore
Sunday, May 22, 2022
HomeOpinionImran Khan’s ‘blame game of conspiracy’

Imran Khan’s ‘blame game of conspiracy’

"People must realize that this time it was the absence of capable political leadership, that led Pakistan to financial and institutional crisis which subsequently led to this dangerous political turmoil. Imran Khan's blame game of conspiracy may lead to institutional confrontations which if not controlled by the state, may result into unrest and turmoil sooner or later"

Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf Chairman Imran Khan has come out unquestionably, as the ‘biggest beneficiary’ of this spectacle of the current political situation. Bravo to him. And he would’ve been the biggest loser, had the government completed its inefficient tenure. For the past decade, Pakistan has been achieving all of its strategic goals passively and sensibly, walking a narrow line between ‘hostile’ super powers, just as how a small ‘insignificant’ country should be doing. Undiplomatic and a Gung Ho style, if adopted by a prime minister of a country, is an invitation to a confrontation. Imran Khan’s unstatesmanlike statements are a mere cherry at the top of a bitter cake that he did not bake, but the United States and India had to gulp in Afghanistan.

This is a reckless game the former prime minister Imran Khan has played with the country since he realised that his rather undiplomatic and blatant words like ‘absolutely not’ had earned him public praise nationally and ‘internationally’. Many may disagree but, what is politics and diplomacy, if not words? Words can break and end wars. Plain refusals by prime ministers to countries you wish to continue doing dealings with cannot be taken nicely, and if that country is the United States, it could mean a little bit of unfriendliness. That is not how civilized countries refuse to each other. Regardless, Imran Khan’s rising ‘populist’ approach meant he could bury his tenure of mismanagement and bad governance. Unlike a statesman, he increased his volume of ridiculing not only his opponents but also calling out the ambassadors of the European Union – a political and economic union of 27 member states – in public addresses.

- Advertisement -

The establishment had no other political option, was probably his misjudgement a few months back, but it mattered less as his popularity of a ‘legendary warrior’ gained momentum. Completing his tenure of five years meant irreparable damage to his legacy. Conveniently placing the blame on his undemocratic selection of electables for all the mess, at this point it seemed he couldn’t wait to bring his ‘ideological’ leaders back. The intolerant and impulsive side of his nature coupled with constant blackmailing of his coalition partners, it was clear that he felt trapped in the parliament and assemblies and he wanted to start the game all over again. And here is Pakistan, in the midst of a threatening crisis where all the parties plotted and executed their own malicious maneuvers, not to mention the ‘foreign interference’.

The recent uprising of our nation against ‘regime change’ is a dream come true, but if the success of the ‘conspiracy’ was made possible because of the gap created by political blunders and bad performance of the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf, must the nation follow them blindly? Shouldn’t there be any answerability of dictatorial errors? Nonetheless, it is the people of Pakistan who must realize that this time it was the absence of capable political leadership, that led the country to financial and institutional crisis which subsequently led to this dangerous political turmoil. Imran Khan’s blame game of conspiracy may lead to institutional confrontations which if not controlled by the state, may result into unrest and turmoil sooner or later.

Advertisement
spot_img

2 COMMENTS

  1. A nice read. The most important thing is yes there should be accountability of errors and “someone” should be punished to save the country in future from such adventures.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Top news

Related articles